Guitar Train

Hop aboard the Guitar Train to the final destination of Advanced Musical Knowledge

Archive for the tag “I Don’t Care Anymore”

How Much Do You Want To Know?



Recently, Quirky T bought two musical memoirs to read aboard The Guitar Train. I have finished reading Phil Collins’ 2016 autobiography, “Not Dead Yet” and am partway through his Genesis bandmate, Mike Rutherford’s, “The Living Years”. The minute I heard Phil Collins was writing a memoir, I knew I had to read it. While looking online for the release date, I came across Mike Rutherford’s book. It was published in 2014. It is interestingly labeled as “the first Genesis memoir” which seems an odd way to promote it. It’s not as if the former bandmates are in a huge feud and one wanted to get his side of the story out before another did. I ordered this first Genesis autobiography but I read it after Phil Collins’.

My interest in reading these books is for the information on what led the musicians to write the songs I love. I’m not very interested in their family lives and I’m definitely not interested in the details of their excessive drinking and drug use. Decades ago, when I first became a Beatles fan, I had to read every book I could find about them. I had to know as much as possible. I needed to know the chronology of their musical journey as well as if they were married and how many children they had. That might be a Beatles fan thing where these are basic facts that every true Beatles fan is supposed to know. I don’t feel that way about my other favorite musicians and bands – Gloria Estefan, Phil Collins, Genesis, Huey Lewis and the News, and Jon Secada. I know about Gloria Estefan’s family life because it is simple- she married the only man she ever dated, has a son and a daughter and is still married to the same man. I only know about Phil Collins’ personal life because it is complicated and very public. So much of his autobiography reflected that. I didn’t realize the incredible backlash he felt when he ended his second marriage. He felt that people who paid to see him in concert were against him. That surprised me because they were fans and I couldn’t imagine a musician feeling like his own fans didn’t like him and still having to perform for them. I wasn’t aware of all this when I saw him in concert but I wouldn’t have held it against him because I like to hear both sides of the story.

I have never had a thought about Mike Rutherford’s personal life. His memoir is interesting because he contrasts his rock and roll life with the strict military life of his father. It is also interesting to read his point of view on Genesis events I had read about in Phil Collins’ memoir. Again, no feud between them. In fact, the end of Genesis had no drama at all. Phil wrote that he was nervous in 1996 about telling Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford that he was leaving the group because “these are my oldest musical friends. Two of my oldest friends, full stop.” When told the news, Tony replied, “Well, it’s a sad day.” Mike said, “We understand. We’re just surprised you stayed this long.” I haven’t finished reading Mike Rutherford’s book yet because like Phil Collins’ book, I want to read it slowly to extend my last new connection to Genesis since there’s no new music or tour coming from them.


On the topic of tours, I have seen some videos of Phil Collins’ recent tour in Europe. The videos sadden me because of Phil’s physical state. He only sits on a stool and sings. No more drumming. He looks old and frail just like he did when he promoted “Not Dead Yet” on TV talk shows. I feel so badly that he is in pain and not physically what he once was. I don’t know if I’d be able to go to his concert and really enjoy it. I’d be thinking about how vibrant he was and sad about what he is.


The two memoirs did not give me huge insight on the inspirations behind their songwriting. That is especially true in the case of the Phil Collins led Genesis since they wrote all their songs together and did not claim individual songwriting credit. Phil wrote in his book, “The three of us have a chat and come to an agreement that anything we’ve finished writing as an individual, we’ll keep for ourselves for future solo projects. Any incomplete but promising ideas, we’ll bring in and put to the band committee.” Phil also debunks the belief that he is responsible for Genesis transitioning from a progressive rock bank to a pop singles band. Writing about the time after Peter Gabriel left Genesis, Phil says, “I’d rather be in an instrumental band than take over the microphone. Tony and Mike have long had aspirations to be songwriters – that is, songs with lyrics, lyrics that need to be sung. More than that: they wanted to write hit songs, singles that will reach the pop charts. It’s a development of some irony that it takes almost ten years of their songwriting skills to “mature” and come up with hit singles – exactly coinciding with the another emerging reality: I’m becoming the singer-by-default.”


As a far as the inspirations behind Phil Collins’ solo songs, I already knew that two of his angriest songs (which are two of my favorite songs) “I Don’t Care Anymore” and “Do You Know, Do You Care” came as a result of the bitter divorce from his first wife. He describes himself as “someone who writes from the heart and not the head”.

I guess an autobiography is not the format for writing in depth about a songwriter’s musical inspirations. Of course that type of in depth book has been written about the Beatles’ songs. The best book I read on that topic is Hunter Davis’ “The Beatles Lyrics”. Regardless, the two memoirs by Genesis bandmates were good reads and recommended for their fans.


Guitar Train passengers, how much do you want to know about your favorite musicians? Do you want personal details or strictly music related details? For which songwriters would you like to read an in depth explanation of the inspirations for their songs?


The Guitar Train Revisits Live Aid

Live Aid DVD cover

Continuing on the 1985 track, the Guitar Train is stopping to revisit Live Aid thirty years after the epic charity concert. Musician Bob Geldof arranged the concert which was held on July 13, 1985 at both Wembley Stadium in London, England and JFK Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Many of the top musicians of the time, including a few women, performed at the two stadiums. I watched the concert live in 1985 on MTV. All these years later, I still remember the performances of Phil Collins, The Cars, Madonna, and the group sing along of “We Are the World”.


Upon recently watching the 2004 DVDs from the concert, my overwhelming thought was so many male musicians, so many mullets. There were too many mulleted men to mention but they included Bryan Adams, Bono, David Bowie, Eric Clapton, and Kenny Loggins. My other thought was how much the TV show “Miami Vice” influenced the male musicians’ fashion style. I saw many pants with rolled up cuffs as if the musicians were going to be wading in the ocean rather than standing on a dry stage.

Live Aid Performers List

Now it’s time to take a look at Live Aid from the perspective of my favorite musicians. Huey Lewis and the News had participated in the recording of the charity single “We Are the World” months before and were scheduled to perform at Live Aid in Philly. They had concerns over whether the food bought from the money raised from the song actually got to the needy people in Africa. The band wanted these concerns addressed and fixed before Live Aid so that any money raised from this concert would get to the people who needed it. Since they felt that the issues were not solved, the band cancelled their performance. (They were still listed on the promotional material for the concert). It’s doubly unfortunate both if the food wasn’t getting to the hungry people and the fact that Huey Lewis and the News didn’t perform. It would be great to have seen them at the time and now have their performance on DVD to watch again. Although who knows if their performance would have made the DVD. I have the 4 DVD set of the concert released in 2004 and it doesn’t include all the performances of the 16 hour concert. Back then, they only thought of the one time live performance, not recording the concert for future viewings and for technology that didn’t yet exist.

The Beatles obviously did not perform at the 1985 concert but their music was performed there. In London, Elvis Costello sang “All You Need is Love” while Bryan Ferry sang John Lennon’s “Jealous Guy”. In Philly, The Thompson Twins, Nile Rodgers, and Madonna sang “Revolution” and Patti LaBelle sang “Imagine”. Paul McCartney was at Wembley Stadium where he played piano and sang “Let It Be”. I am surprised that he only sang one song. He certainly had many to choose from between The Beatles and Wings. I definitely would have liked to have heard more from him as I’m sure the audience would have as well.


Phil Collins was the talk of Live Aid because he was the only musician to perform at both stadiums as he played at Wembley and then flew on the Concorde to play in Philly hours later. In both countries, he played the same two songs, “Against All Odds” and “In the Air Tonight”. I don’t understand why with three solo albums of songs to choose from, he would repeat songs. Obviously, “I Don’t Care Anymore” and “Do You Know, do you care?” would not be good choices for a concert raising money to help suffering people but he had plenty of other songs to choose from.

In London, Phil Collins played piano for “Against All Odds” and “In the Air Tonight” which struck me as odd because he’s never played piano at any of the solo and Genesis concerts I‘ve attended. He then sang “Long Long Way to Go” from his at the time newly released third solo album “No Jacket Required”. This is the song I really remember from watching the concert at the time; the chorus of the song stuck in my head as a child. Sting joined Phil on that song and Phil joined Sting on his song, “Every Breath You Take”. I thought they were very good together and I wonder why they haven’t done more songs together. Overall Phil’s performance was subdued and not as rocking as it could have been with other songs or with Genesis.


Hours later in Philly, Phil Collins played drums for Eric Clapton for three Eric Clapton songs. Phil then did “Against All Odds” and “In the Air Tonight”. It was odd again to see him playing the piano especially on “In the Air Tonight” which is known for his drumming and is always the instrumental highlight in his concerts. I found this version to be too slow and ballady and I felt it needed the drums. It’s also ironic that he wasn’t playing the drums since he just played them for Eric Clapton’s songs and then played them for Led Zepplin. Here’s been much written about how disastrous the reunion of Led Zepplin was at Live Aid. I don’t understand why Phil was blamed for that since he wasn’t the only drummer playing for the band and he didn’t have much time to practice with them. Led Zepplin would not allow the performance to appear on the DVD of the concert so it’s not included.


I was familiar with most of the musical acts who played in Philly. However, there were many acts in London that I did not know such as Status Quo, The Style Council, Ultravox, Nik Kershaw, and Alison Moyet. To the British Guitar Train passengers, can you tell me if these musicians were famous in 1985 and did they deserve to perform at Live Aid? Have any of them retained their fame 30 years later?


To all Guitar Train passengers, what do you remember from watching Live Aid? What were the highlights and the lowlights for you?


Favorites Month: Phil Collins

All this month, Quirky T will be conducting the Guitar Train to stop at each of her all time favorite musicians. The second destination is Phil Collins.

Phil Collins - No Jacket Required

Phil Collins – No Jacket Required



First Stop (The First Time I Heard His Music)
I first became aware of Phil Collins in 1985 with the release of his third solo album, “No Jacket Required”.  This album is a great mix of fast songs, “love” songs, and angry songs.  The album starts with “Sussudio”  which is just a fun song, not meant to be very deep.   In 1985 and still now, I am interested in hearing songs other than the typical happy-in-love songs so that’s why I connected with Phil Collins’ music.  I liked the fact that the “love” songs on this album are more realistic and contain confusion such as “Long Long Way To Go”, “One More Night”,  “Doesn’t Anyone Stay Together Anymore”, and “Inside Out”.



Two of my favorite songs from this album, “Don’t Lose My Number” and “Take Me Home”, also have great and memorable music videos. The music video for “Don’t Lose My Number” deconstructs a music video as it is a video about what they should include in the video.  Phil Collins appears in several  scenarios which parody movies and other music videos as they decide what this video should be about.  The result is a funny and entertaining video.  I always liked the video for “Take Me Home”  which shows Phil singing all around the world with great background shots.



“No Jacket Required” also contains the angry songs that I need to hear to know that I’m not the only one who is not always happy.  It deepens my connection to Phil Collins.  The songs “Only You Know and I Know”, “I Don’t Wanna Know”, and “Who Said I Would” all have the amount of venom I need to hear.



The album ends with my all time favorite song and it’s available only on the CD of “No Jacket Required”.  The song is “We Said Hello Goodbye.” I bought a CD player just so I could play this song over and over.  It is such a beautiful song filled with many optimistic lyrics that have become my personal catch phrases to help me get through life.  If it was the only song that Phil Collins ever wrote and sang, I would be eternally grateful to him but lucky for me, there’s a whole album of great songs that made me a Phil Collins fan for life.



Invisible Touch blue t-shirt


Second Stop (What I Did Next)
I then listened to his work with Genesis, especially 1986’s “Invisible Touch”. Since I was playing catch-up, I was confused when I heard Phil Collins singing on the radio as to whether it was a Phil Collins solo song or a Genesis song. Remember, this was before Shazam and being able to look up anything on the Internet. I learned that Genesis songs generally have a harder edge than Phil Collins solo songs with the exception of the solo songs such as “Do You Know, Do You Care?” and “I Don’t Care Anymore” which are two of the angriest songs I have ever heard. Both songs appear on Phil’s second solo album, 1982’s “Hello, I Must Be Going”.



No Jacket Required CD back



Repeated Destinations (Favorite Song and Album)

For Phil Collins solo, my favorite album is the first of his that I heard, “No Jacket Required”.  I can listen to it over and over and never get sick of it.  I still get excited to hear those songs and feel the connection I feel to Phil’s lyrics. As I wrote before, my favorite song is “We Said Hello Goodbye”.

My favorite Genesis album is also the first one I heard, “Invisible Touch”. My favorite song is “Turn It On Again” from the 1980 album, “Duke” followed closely by “That’s All” from the 1983 self titled album, “Genesis”.

Now Departing (What Non-Fans Say about Him)
Throughout my life, I have been made fun of because I am a Phil Collins fan. I never understood why people did not like him. The most common complaint is that he ruined Genesis by making them record only shorter, hit songs.  That’s not true as even after he became the lead singer of Genesis, they still recorded long, heavily instrumental songs. Some examples of these are “Home by the Sea/Second Home by the Sea” (from 1983’s “Genesis”), “Domino” (from 1986’s “Invisible Touch”), and “Driving the Last Spike” (from 1991’s “We Can’t Dance”). They did also make shorter songs which became hit songs but that doesn’t make them bad songs just because they were popular.

As with anything, it’s easier to just join the haters bandwagon then to actually listen to the albums and have an educated opinion.



Phil Collins cu face t-shirt



Conducting This Train (Why He Will Always be My Favorite)
It never really bothered me to be made fun of for liking Phil Collins because I really enjoy his music. I wasn’t going to not listen to what made me happy so I could be considered cool. Plus, I wasn’t the only one at his solo and Genesis concerts in New Jersey in the 1990’s and 2000’s. I was joined by thousands of other happy (cool) fans.

Between his solo work and Genesis, Phil Collins has created songs that endure and are my go to songs when I want to hear something great and familiar. I could relate to many of his songs and that connection helped me through hard times in my life. I’m very sad that he’s not making any more new music. I will never again have the pleasure of hearing a brand new Phil Collins song.



Genesis - Turn It On Again The Hits

Genesis – Turn It On Again The Hits

All Aboard (Why I Wish Others Would Listen to Him and Where to Start)
I would like people to listen to Phil Collins songs instead of automatically disrespecting and dismissing him. For his solo songs, I would recommend listening to the CD “No Jacket Required”. For Genesis, as a starter, I recommend some compilation CDs: “Turn It On Again: The Hits”, “Live The Way We Walk Volume One: The Shorts” containing shorter songs, and “Live The Way We Walk Volume Two: The Longs” containing longer songs with extended instrumentals.

Official Track
For more information, check out and


Guitar Train passengers, when did you first hear your favorite musicians and how did the music make you feel?


Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: